Award-Winning Documentary Film ‘Dinkheller’ on fallen Deputy Kyle Dinkheller

//Award-Winning Documentary Film ‘Dinkheller’ on fallen Deputy Kyle Dinkheller
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See the Film in North Charleston

What: Award-Winning Documentary Film ‘Dinkheller’ on fallen Deputy Kyle Dinkheller

Where: Olde Village Community Theater 4820 Jenkins Ave, North Charleston

When: Saturday 11/10 at 10:00 am

Support independent film in the Charleston area by joining us at the South Carolina Underground Film Festival and see the human side of a fallen Deputy more than 20-years after his line of duty death. Everyone in attendance will learn the story of what happened before the incident and gain a new understanding of the humanity at the heart of one of law enforcement’s most notorious dash cam videos.

Check out the trailer:

For more information, Visit: www.DinkhellerMovie.com

Dinkheller Documentary in the News  (from Macon Film Festival):

https://www.13wmaz.com/article/news/local/filmmaker-creates-movie-about-fallen-laurens-co-police-officer-kyle-dinkheller/93-585149486

https://surgetelevision.unreel.me/watch/recent/WL4T5nQM1385-dinkheller-interview?fbclid=IwAR2ICexH9hH1iBs8a1rOiZ1oerhtslt9LdcknL3GwGyOprSoDipkOzsuO6E

The Story

On Monday, January 12, 1998, near the end of his shift, Deputy Kyle Wayne Dinkheller of the Laurens County Sheriff’s Office (LCSO) in Georgia, pulled over motorist Andrew Howard Brannan for speeding. A verbal confrontation escalated to a shootout resulting in Brannan murdering Deputy Dinkheller. The murder continues to get national attention (e.g., training in police academies) because the stop and shootout were captured on a personal video recorder Dinkheller had placed on his patrol car dashboard and activated when he stopped Brannan.

In the shootout, Dinkheller was armed with his semi-automatic service handgun, and Brannan had an M1 Carbine rifle. Dinkheller shot and wounded Brannan. Despite this, Brannan fired the rifle, reloaded it, fired a lethal shot into Dinkheller’s eye, and fled the scene in his Toyota pickup truck. The next morning, police found Brannan still in Laurens County, hiding in a sleeping bag beneath a camouflage tarp. Police arrested Brannan for the murder of Dinkheller.

Brannan pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity, claiming in part that he suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stemming from his military service as a soldier in the Vietnam War. Because Dinkheller’s video recorded most of Brannan’s actions, the jury found he murdered Dinkheller in a premeditated, torturous, and cruel manner. Two years following the murder, on January 28, 2000, the jury convicted Brannan. On January 30, 2000, Brannan was sentenced to death. Nearly fifteen years later, on January 13, 2015, the State of Georgia executed Brannan by lethal injection.

On January 12, 2018, to mark the 20th anniversary of Dinkheller’s death, filmmaker Patrick Shaver released his documentary film, Dinkheller, which tells the story of those who held Dinkheller close to their hearts. Shaver described the dashcam video of Dinkheller’s death as being “the most horrific video I’ve ever seen in my life”. The documentary premiered at Theatre Dublin on January 12, 2018, at 6:00 p.m. in Dublin, Georgia.